Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Consuming Literature

The other day I stumbled across this post by Marla Popova about a new book called Fictitious Dishes: An Album of Literature's Most Memorable Meals by Dinah Fried. The book looks fascinating, as Fried elegantly photographs fifty meals from classic works of literature. I have yet to read the book (though I will definitely pick up a copy), but it got me thinking about how we relate to food through literature. 
 
The best authors of fiction draw us into another realm by breaking down the boundaries between us, the reader, and the characters. It's a challenge, certainly, and yet skilled writers can somehow make us feel an intimate connection to people who exist only in our collective imaginations. I believe that food is one means authors can use to help make the characters feel more real. We all relate with food on a daily basis, and food helps us define who we are at any given moment. Why wouldn't the same hold true for fictional characters? It bring us further in to their emotional world and we begin to see them more as real people.

Consider, for example, a scene that always strikes deep for me in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. This scene occurs at the end of the novel when Gatsby is waiting outside Daisy and Tom's house to make sure everything is okay after Daisy's hit-and-run. Nick joins Gatsby and goes to the window to see what's happening inside:
Daisy and Tom were sitting opposite each other at the kitchen table with a plate of cold fried chicken between them and two bottles of ale. He was talking intently across the table at her and in his earnestness his hand had fallen upon and covered her own. Once in a while she looked up at him and nodded in agreement.

They weren't happy, and neither of them had touched the chicken or the ale--and yet they weren't unhappy either. There was an unmistakable air of natural intimacy about the picture and anybody would have said that they were conspiring together.
Nick tells Gatsby everything's fine and that he should go home and get some sleep, but Gatsby wants to stay and wait for Daisy to go to bed.
He put his hands in his coat pockets and turned back eagerly to his scrutiny of the house, as though my presence marred the sacredness of the vigil. So I walked away and left him standing there in the moonlight--watching over nothing.
This scene always impacted me emotionally, not so much because of Fitzgerald’s prose or description of Daisy and Tom, but because of the image of cold fried chicken and unsipped ale. This uneaten meal is a hardened and real vision of Daisy and her choice to stay with Tom. Nick sees a reality around that kitchen table that Gatsby chooses to resist—a reality where Daisy is careless and selfish, not the idealized beautiful being Gatsby envisioned. Gatsby chooses instead to look at the light coming from her window—to stand and wait for a sign that his dream has not ended. To Gatsby, he watches over the possibility of Daisy. And yet Nick knows it all comes down to some uneaten chicken. It is the food in this scene that brings us more deeply into the characters' world and leaves us feeling just as unsettled as Nick.

Dinah Fried's book doesn't include this particular meal, but it has many others from classic works such as The Secret Garden, To Kill a Mockingbird, and On the Road. From the few photographs featured in Popova's article, these stand out to me the most:

Heidi

Moby Dick

The Catcher in the Rye

Check out Dinah Fried's website or Marla Popova's article for more information and images from Fictitious Dishes: An Album of Literature's Most Memorable Meals.

Monday, April 21, 2014

Omurice Jam Jam

You ever have one of those days where you go to the post office to pick up a mysterious parcel that you missed getting delivered and it turns out to be a box from Seoul, South Korea, from a person you’ve never met, filled with Korean food and literature? 

No? Yeah, me neither. Until today.

As I walked down the street in Brooklyn, clutching my box, I couldn’t help but feel strangely connected to someone half-way across the world. Someone I’ll probably never meet and yet we can connect through a similar delight in food.

It all began back in 2012 when I received an email from Cho Kyungkyu. He was writing to inquire if he could use a couple photos I took of Louis’ Lunch in New Haven in his upcoming book. Sure, I responded. Why not? He offered to send me a copy of the book as a thank you. And then I promptly forgot about it.

Nearly two years later I get an another email from Cho: Hey, remember me? 

So after a few weeks I receive a box in the mail. I was surprised at how big it was. How large could this book possibly be? Turns out that Cho decided to send me some snacks as well!

The food consisted of two different noodle cups (always good to have around!) and a red box with a photo of fried chicken. I don’t really know what it is, but it involves mini-drumstick shaped crispy things that taste kind of like shake-and-bake. I love miniature food. I love fried chicken. I love shake-and-bake. I love pretty much anything crispy. These are amazing. 



I wish I could read the book—it looks really interesting! The accompanying letter informed that the book is entitled Omurice Jam Jam and that it’s volume four in a series about food, his life, and his family. The book is filled with illustrations of food, family, and outings at various locations. Lo and behold, my photos made it in! 

















There’s something very strange and satisfying about having pics from this blog appear in a random Korean publication. I think it’s pretty great. Maybe I’ll make it to Korea sometime, but in the meantime at least I can enjoy these fried chicken snacks and live vicariously through Cho's cartoons!


Tuesday, April 15, 2014

The Besty Profiles A Slice of Earthly Delight

Exciting news! The Besty, a new food website, has written up a profile about A Slice of Earthly Delight. Check it out here!

The Breslin

A couple weeks ago I had a great outing with my sisters (and one of our honorary sisters) to The Breslin at the Ace Hotel, located at 16 West 29 Street in New York. Dinner was amazing and the company excellent.

Our meat-laden meal began with a terrine board: guinea hen with morels, rabbit and prune, rustic pork with pistachios, head cheese, liverwurst. All served with pickles, piccalilli and mustard. This platter was decadent enough in itself, but it was only the beginning.

 Terrine Board

We also split a scotch egg and scrumpets with mint vinegar. Having no idea what a scrumpet is, I was pleased to discover it is lamb breaded and fried. Kind of a like a lamb fishstick. It's a bit heavy, but sharing is a nice way to get a taste without going overboard.

Scrumpet with a vegetable thing in the background

Extreme Close Up Scrumpet & Scotch Egg

We also shared a lamb burger, which was awesome. I had it once before at The Breslin and it's definitely a good deal. As you can see, the meat is cooked very rare, allowing the taste of the lamb to really come through. The feta cheese makes it a little too salty for me, so this time around I tried some bites without the feta and found it more pleasing.


Lammmb Burger

Razor clams also appeared during the meal (and disappeared, quickly). I'd never tried razor clams before and I really enjoyed them. They are a bit heartier than regular clams, and the good chefs at The Breslin cooked them perfectly.

 Razor Clams, with a Scotch Egg peeking out in the distance

To round out the meal we got a roasted beet salad and broccoli. Because, vegetables are a thing that people should eat. But also there was meat in the vegetable dishes as well. You can never escape the meat.


 Tasty Vegetables

If you get a chance, treat yourself to some awesome food at The Breslin! I also recommend retiring to the lobby of the Ace Hotel for a drink to end your delicious meal.

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Quote of the Week: Hungry Fellows

April 2, 1847: Happy birthday to little Tommy Reed!

Tommy was the son of Margret and James Reed. He was four years old during the Donner Party's ordeal. It was less than a month ago that Tommy made it to safety. Now he celebrates his fifth birthday with his family on a Napa Valley Ranch.



Seventy years later...
 
San Jose Evening News 
April 7, 1917

"Always so long as Mr. [Thomas] Reed lives to him the most terrible of all pain was hunger. He could not endure the sight of wasted food. He often surprised people by picking up scraps from the table and putting them in a paper. It was not to save the food, but because he wished to give it to someone in need.

'I am sure,' he often said, 'I'll find some hungry fellows over at the railroad station.' He always found the poor fellows, gave them what he had, sought out more hungry men and returned to the house for another supply of food."


 
James and Marget Reed 

Thursday, March 27, 2014

THE TOWER

AntiMatter Collective presents THE TOWER--a psychedelic journey into the history and mythology of the Donner Party, a group of snowbound pioneers who notoriously resorted to cannibalism to survive the brutal winter of 1846-47. Historical narrative collides with hallucinatory imagery to create a shifting landscape filled with the whispers of the past and the roar of the future. A vision of adolescent America: frostbitten, bloodstained, ravenous. 




Standard Toykraft
722 Metropolitan Ave, 3rd floor
Williamsburg, Brooklyn

April 12-26
Wednesday through Sunday, 8pm

Help tear it all down by donating to our fundraising campaign!

Sunday, March 23, 2014

Quote of the Week: Kindred Flesh

“All day Mrs. [Sarah] Foster held her brother's head in her lap and by every means in her power sought to soothe his death agonies. The sunlight faded from the surrounding summits. Darkness slowly emerged from the canyons and enfolded forest and hill slope in her silent embrace. The glittering stars appeared in the heavens and the bright full moon rose over the eastern mountain crests. The silence, the profound solitude, the ever present wastes of snow, the weird moonlight, and above all the hollow moans of the dying boy in her lap rendered this night the most impressive in the life of Mrs. Foster. She says she never beholds a bright moonlight without recurring with a shudder to this night on the Sierra. At two o clock in the morning Lemuel Murphy ceased to breathe. The warm tears and kisses of the afflicted sisters were showered upon lips that would never more quiver with pain.



Days and perhaps weeks of starvation were awaiting them in the future and they dare not neglect to provide as best they might. Each of the four bodies was divested of its flesh and the flesh was dried. Although no person partook of kindred flesh sights were often witnessed that were blood curdling. Mrs. Foster as we have seen fairly worshiped her brother Lemuel. Has human pen power to express the shock of horror this sister received when she saw her brother's heart thrust through with a stick and broiling upon the coals? No man can record or read such an occurrence without a cry of agony! What then did she endure who saw this cruel sight?”

--C. F. McGlashan, History of the Donner Party: A Tragedy in the Sierras, 1879


Song of the Week: Hearts and Bones

"On the last leg of the journey,
they started a long time ago.
The arc of a love affair,
rainbows in the high desert air,
mountain passes slipping into stones...
Hearts and bones."

Rekindling

Dear Readers,

In the words of the narrator of Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, “I been away a long time.” It’s true. I’m sorry for my prolonged absence. It seems, however, that the time has arrived to rekindle this food blog.

So. LIFE UPDATE. A couple years ago I started meditating and practicing Buddhism again. In August I moved to Brooklyn, which I do believe was a very wise decision. I also got an iPhone over the summer. What? Hello, twenty-first century.

Seriously though, life has been good to me over the last year and a half of my food blogging hiatus.

I’m now four years into my doctoral program for American cultural history. After wavering in the should-I-stay-or-should-I-go dance of graduate school, I recently decided (i.e., six days ago) that perhaps I’ve been pursuing the wrong course of study. Then it clicked. It's not that academia isn’t for me. It's that I've been struggling to study topics not appropriate for me at this point in my life. A moment of clarity dawned upon me and I realized—I’m a historian of cannibalism. How could I have ever thought I was anything else? It all made sense. My dissertation? The Donner Party.

Of course.

Which brings me to the next and, quite honestly, most important aspect of my life right now. THE TOWER. For just under the past year I’ve been serving as a dramaturg for an incredible play called The Tower (as in the tarot card representing chaos, collapse, sudden change, downfall, revelation…) about the Donner Party, a topic I’ve always found fascinating. For months I’ve been researching the history that surrounds these ill-fated emigrants who notoriously resorted to cannibalism to survive a brutal winter in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in 1846-47. Most amazingly, I’ve been able to fulfill a passion I didn’t quite know how to best manifest on my own—turning the past into art.

Now that I’ve become intimately involved with the members of the Donner Party it seems I have no option but to stay with them. I’m just riding the energy I’ve tapped into through this process, and I’m ready to see where it takes me. So, dissertating? It’s a thing, apparently. I think I’m finally ready for it.

What does this all mean for A Slice of Earthly Delight? Well, I’m about to be immersed in food history. Which means I’m going to need an outlet to write about food thingz. Which means you all get to hear my ramblings once again! Everybody wins.

It also means that I’m going to be writing a lot about cannibalism. Be prepared.

Love,
Maya




Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Birthday Cake!


I’m normally not much of a baker. It just doesn’t bring me the same thrill as sautéing vegetables, listening to the soft simmer of soup bubbling away on the stove, or basting a nice piece of meat in the oven. My lukewarm approach to baking changed, however, when it came time to create a birthday cake for one of my best friends. I say “create” rather than bake because this was not your ordinary birthday cake…this was a triple-decker, over-the-top, completely ridiculous, and absurdly delicious birthday cake. 


The bottom layer consisted of a funfetti cake. Then I frosted the top with a layer of swirled nutella and fluffernutter (a combination I shall name “flufftella”). On top of that was a dark chocolate brownie. Another layer of flufftella. And then…and then waffles. Not just standard breakfast waffles, but waffles that contained bits of a dark chocolate bar with coconut and caramel. Yes, I did that.





 After the cake was assembled I frosted the whole thing in home-made whipped cream and decked it out with rainbow sprinkles. And of course no birthday cake is complete without brightly colored candles dripping wax all over it. 


This cake was seriously awesome. I didn’t add any sugar to the whipped cream or the waffle batter so that it wouldn’t get overly sweet. Don’t get me wrong, it was still a sugar bomb--while making the cake I got such a sugar rush and crash from tasting everything that I had to stop baking and take a nap. But these are the hardships we must endure to make our friend’s birthdays extra special. So say goodbye to boring birthday cakes. Next time you’ve got to make one, while settle for just one plain cake with some frosting? Why not combine three awesome desserts into one massive baked good of happiness? Trust me, it’s so worth it.



Sunday, March 25, 2012

Steak and Arugula Salad

For many of us spring has arrived. Sunny days and warm temperatures call for grilling, and tonight I just so happened to have access to a grill...and a steak. 

Before grilling the sirloin steak rare I coated it with just a little bit of olive oil, salt, and fresh-ground black pepper. After the grill was nice and hot I cooked the steak for just a few minutes on each side, leaving it seared on the outside and tender and rare on the inside. After removing it from the grill I let it sit for a few more minutes before slicing it, allowing the juices to circulate and settle. 


While the steak cooked and sat, I prepared an arugula salad as the final resting place for the lovely steak. Before I ate it, of course. The salad was simple--just baby arugula, chopped fresh cherry tomatoes, and finely chopped red onion. I tossed it all together with a vinaigrette composed of blood-orange olive oil, lemon juice, salt, black pepper, crush red pepper, and a raw egg yolk. 


I tossed the dressing with the salad and topped it with the sliced steak. It's a simple and absolutely delicious dish for these delightful spring days.


Honey, Honey

Friday, March 16, 2012

Irish Cream

Last year I put up a recipe for delicious homemade Irish cream. This year I decided to repost the recipe and document the process for your viewing pleasure. 


This recipe is adapted from the cookbook Best of the Best from North Carolina Cookbook, but I've made a couple of changes over the years.

Ingredients:


1-1/4 cup Irish whiskey

4 eggs

1 (14 ounce) can sweetened-condensed milk

2 tablespoons vanilla extract

1 tablespoon coconut extract

1 tablespoon instant coffee (or coffee extract)

2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
(or chocolate extract if you can find it)

Blend all the ingredients together and refrigerate for about 12 hours before serving over ice. Enjoy!






Monday, February 6, 2012

Gaze First, Then It's Time to Drink

"I craved a swig of whiskey, but it was in the knapsack on my back and the idea of twisting around to extract the bottle did not seem altogether wise. Nix on that. So I thought about having a drink instead. A quiet bar, MJQ's Vendome playing low, a bowl of nuts, a double whiskey on the rocks. The glass is sitting on the counter, untouched for a moment, just looked at. Whiskey, like a beautiful woman, demands appreciation. You gaze first, then it's time to drink."


--Haruki Murakami, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

 

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Semiotics of the Kitchen

"I was concerned with something like the notion of 'language speaking the subject,' and with the transformation of the woman herself into a sign in a system of signs that represent a system of food production, a system of harnessed subjectivity." – Martha Rosler